Survey on acceptability of a brain-computer interface to improve hand function after stroke

Location
ThincLab, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5000
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Would you use a restorative brain-computer interface if it can improve your hand functions after stroke?

It is believed that impaired movement is caused by damage in specific parts of the brain, which in turn lead to disconnection in the neural pathways that are in charge of the movement. We have investigated a technique named motor imagery based brain-computer interfacing (MI-BCI) that allows re-routing of the impaired neural pathways caused by stroke.

However, to further develop this technology we need to know the features of the interface that are most important for users of the technology, and the considerations of cost relative to benefit in using it.

We are looking for adults aged 18–80 years, who have experienced a stroke at least 6 months ago, and who still have problems with motor problems of their hand, to participate in a survey. The survey may take 10–15 minutes to complete.

You can take the survey at: http://adelaide.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4UUhKJIXwHG1KGF

Contact:
For further information, please contact Dr Sam Darvishi by sending an email to sam.darvishi@adelaide.edu.au

Download the participant information sheet (DOCX 75 KB)